Category Archives: Research

Upcoming workshop: Developing a research track record on a shoestring

Kearns2On February 8th 2017 we are welcoming back researcher & educator, Hugh Kearns, who will be running a workshop for academic staff and researchers “Developing a research track record on a shoestring”. Hugh is recognised internationally and regularly lectures at universities across the world, including Oxford, Harvard, Stanford and, now for the fourth time, Northampton.

Academics and researchers are constantly being told to increase their research outputs if they want to get promoted or funded, but it becomes a catch 22 when you can’t do much research because you have no money, but no one will give you money because you haven’t done enough research. Despite this situation there are ways to build a research track record that require less money and can give you the start you need to build a decent track record (or even just to keep your head above water!). Read the rest of this entry

Predatory Journals

The problem

Hundreds of new open access journals are being set up by reputable publishers, scholarly societies and universities each year. Unfortunately, alongside these reputable journals, an increasing number of pay-to-publish “vanity” journals continue to appear. Such journals are referred to as ‘predatory’ or ‘bogus’ journals. Some academic authors are being scammed into submitting their research outputs to be published in these journals that do not have proper quality control or peer review processes.

The risks

  • No proper peer review is carried out to preserve the quality of the research output.
  • Damage to the reputation of the researcher and institution.
  • Researchers and institutions lend their reputation to a disreputable publication.
  • Negative impact on the REF submission if the publication is not detected.
  • Your article will most likely not be able to be published elsewhere.
  • Copyright would likely be retained by the publisher.

How to check for predatory journals?

Think   Check   Submit  – Provides a checklist of questions that can be used to identify trusted journals.

Look out for the following warning signs:

  • Board of Editors list shows that members are not recognised in their field or that they are affiliated with questionable institutions; however, this should be done with caution, as Board member names may be used without their permission.
  • Journals with dubious or non-existent addresses for their registered office.
  • Unsolicited email or paper communication inviting publication in journals you don’t know or have never heard of.
  • Unsolicited invitations to conferences run by event managers, not professionals in the research area, often at attractive destinations.
  • Note – Legitimate new journals acknowledge if they are newly created and do not yet have an impact factor.

Further steps to undertake:

  • Consult the Directory of Open Access Journals for reputable journals (doaj.org)
  • Check the publisher’s membership of Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (oaspa.org), Committee on Publication Ethics (www.publicationethics.org), and International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers (www.stm-assoc.org).
  • Reputable journals typically will be listed in the Journal Citation Report.
  • Resist the temptation to publish quickly and easily in any journal. Be aware of the publication landscape in your research area and the most reputable journals (check with your research leader if unsure).
  • Jeffrey Beall (librarian at the University of Colorado Denver) has also created lists of ‘Potential, possible or predatory’ scholarly open access journals and publishers. This list is controversial and has been debated, however it has been listed on many university webpages.

Related articles and blogs

University of Edinburgh Standards in Open Access scholarly communication: http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/information-services/research-support/publish-research/open-access/1.108824

Jeffery Beall’s website on scholarly Open Access: http://scholarlyoa.com/

‘Investigating Journals: The dark side of publishing’ by Declan Butler (in Nature): http://www.nature.com/news/investigating-journals-the-dark-side-of-publishing-1.12666

Berger, Monica and Jill Cirasella. “Beyond Beall’S List Better Understanding Predatory Publishers“. Crln.acrl.org. N.p., 2017. Web. 4 Jan. 2017.

Further Information

If you have any further questions on the information displayed here or if you would like advice on a specific journal please contact us at OpenAccess@northampton.ac.uk.

Top 10 Research Outputs from 2016

Happy New Year to all, looking forward to making more research available and easily found, so that others can benefit from the research done here in Northampton.

Nie, M. and Armellini, A. (2012) Enhancing curriculum design and delivery with OER. In: Cambridge 2012: Innovation and Impact – Openly Collaborating to Enhance Education, Conference Proceedings. Milton Keynes: Support Centre for Open Resources in Education, The Open University. 9780749229375. pp. 365-369. 2812
Mackley, J. S. (2012) The Anglo Saxons and their gods (still) among us. Lecture presented to: The University of Northampton Staff Research Forum, The University of Northampton, 12 March 2012. (Unpublished) 1971
Livingstone, I. and Warren, A. (1996) Aeolian Geomorphology: an Introduction. Harlow: Longman. 058208704X. 1242
Mortimer, K. and Laurie, S. (2012) Barriers to the implementation of Integrated Marketing Communications: the client perspective. In: Proceedings of Academy of Marketing Conference 2012. Southampton: Academy of Marketing. 9780854329472. 1050
Arvinen-Barrow, M. (2009) Psychological rehabilitation from sport injury: issues in training and development of chartered physiotherapists. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 936
Wilson, J. M. (2012) Antipodean rewritings of Great Expectations: Peter Carey’s Jack Maggs (1997) and Lloyd Jones’s Mister Pip (2007). In: Glenn, D., Haque, M. R., Kooyman , B. and Bierbaum, N. (eds.) The Shadow of the Precursor. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 220-235. 816
Hollinshead, R., Farley, R. and Keating, E. (2010) Public art strategies. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Grit & Pearl. 631
Mackley, J. S. (2007) The medieval legend of Judas Iscariot: the Vita of Judas and the Gospel of Barnabas. Paper presented to: York Medieval Religion Research Group Meeting, King’s Manor, University of York, 01 February 2007. (Unpublished) 603
Stickley, A. (2015) An exploration of occupational therapy practice in social enterprises in the UK. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 588
Watley, G. (2012) Identity and consumption practices of Northamptonshire Caribbeans c.1955-1989. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 566

Wondering Where to Publish?

Top 10 downloads – NECTAR – November 2016

Research Output’s Top 10 Downloaded in November 2016 No of Downloads
Pickton, M. (2013) Writing your research plan. In: Grant, M. J., Sen, B. and Spring, H. (eds.) Research, Evaluation and Audit: Key Steps in Demonstrating Your Value. London: Facet Publishing. pp. 45-63. 219
Lama, A., Bates, M. P., Covington, A. D., Allen, S. C. H. and Antunes, A. P. M. (2013) Methods of isolation and identification of pathogenic and potential pathogenic bacteria from skins and tannery effluents. Journal of the American Leather Chemists Association. 108(2), pp. 48-62. 0002-9726. 129
Jackson, P. and Feldman, M. (2011) The EDL: Britain’s ‘New Far Right’ social movement. Northampton: The University of Northampton. 104
Mackley, J. S. (2012) The Anglo Saxons and their gods (still) among us. Lecture presented to: The University of Northampton Staff Research Forum, The University of Northampton, 12 March 2012. (Unpublished) 100
Preece, D. and Zhao, Y. (2014) An evaluation of Bag Books multi-sensory stories. Northampton: The University of Northampton. (Unpublished) 58
Kassem, R. (2014) Detecting asset misappropriation: a framework for external auditors. International Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Performance Evaluation (IJAAPE). 10(1), pp. 1-42. 1740-8008. 56
Nie, M. and Armellini, A. (2012) Enhancing curriculum design and delivery with OER. In: Cambridge 2012: Innovation and Impact – Openly Collaborating to Enhance Education, Conference Proceedings. Milton Keynes: Support Centre for Open Resources in Education, The Open University. 9780749229375. pp. 365-369. 52
Wilson, J. M. (2013) Introduction. In: Wilson, J. M., Kimber, G. and de Sousa Correa, D. (eds.) Katherine Mansfield and the (Post)colonial. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. pp. 1-11. 51
Wiseman-Trowse, N. J. B., Starr, M., Murray, C. and Round, J. (2011) Editor. Studies in Comics: Alan Moore Themed Issue. 2(1) London: Intellect. 2040-3232. 49
Poynter, D. J. (2008) ‘The report on her transfer was shell shock’: a study of the psychological disorders of nurses and female Voluntary Aid Detachments who served alongside the British and Allied Expeditionary Forces during the First World War, 1914-1918. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 49

Stern Review of REF – Building on Success and Learning from Experience

The independent review of the process for assessing university research and allocating public funding has been published by Lord Stern.

President of the British Academy Lord Nicholas Stern was commissioned by the government to carry out the review of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) to ensure future university research funding is allocated more efficiently, offers greater rewards for excellent research and reduces the administrative burden on institutions.

The report makes a number of recommendations for future exercises, including the number of research active staff who should be entered, a broadening of the term ‘impact’ and new institutional-level assessment.

You can download the full report by clicking here.