Blog Archives

Paying for open access: how much will it cost?

FAQ: How do I find out whether a journal has an option for immediate open access and if so, how much it will cost?

Does your proposed funder require immediate open access to all research outputs?

Do you need to include the cost of APCs in your bid?

Do you need to make sure your work has the earliest possible visibility and impact?

If the answer to any of these questions is yes then you will need to know whether any journal you choose to publish in offers an immediate (‘gold’) open access option and if so, how much it will cost.

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Open Access at the University of Northampton: state of play

Since 2007 Library and Learning Services have been offering services to researchers wishing to engage with the Open Access (OA) agenda.  This post summarises the policy, services and support now available at the University of Northampton.

Open Access policy:

In December 2015 the University Research and Enterprise Committee approved an OA policy for the University.  Aligned with, and supporting, HEFCE’s open access policy for the REF, the University policy states: “the University supports the principle of open access and expects researchers to share their research outputs freely, subject to legal, ethical, commercial or contractual constraints”.  The policy requires researchers to ‘act on acceptance‘ in depositing their work in the University’s institutional repository, NECTAR.

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University Open Access Fund

Open Access logoFAQ: Does the University have any funds available to pay publishers’ article processing charges (APCs) and if so, how can I apply for these?

As of August 1st 2016 the University of Northampton has set aside an Open Access (OA) fund to support the payment of article processing charges (APCs).

APCs are the charges levied by publishers to cover the cost of making an individual article OA at the point of publication (aka ‘gold’ OA).  This may be in a fully OA journal or in a ‘hybrid’ journal which makes otherwise subscription only articles available OA on payment of an APC.

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Your online thesis: what you need to know

The PGR Thesis and Examination Policy states that it is mandatory for final, post-examination copies of research degree theses to be deposited in NECTAR.  But what does this mean for PGR students (and their supervisors)?

This post will outline the policy and procedure for depositing your thesis in NECTAR and some the issues you need to consider when doing this.

Gather your strength and read on…

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Act on Acceptance: HEFCE policy comes into effect

Act on acceptance leaflet A4 v3The much anticipated HEFCE open access policy came into effect on 1st April and researchers wishing to submit their work to the next REF must now deposit the final peer reviewed copy of any article or conference paper (with an ISSN) into NECTAR as soon as possible after it has been accepted for publication.

This leaflet describes the three simple steps that you should follow to ensure your work is not excluded from the next REF.

 

Related posts:

Further information:

If you have any queries about NECTAR or the HEFCE policy please contact the LLS Research Support team (Miggie Pickton or Nick Dimmock).

We are also very happy to come and talk about these to your research group or School Research and Enterprise Committee.  If you would like us to do this then just get in touch.

SHERPA REF tool clarifies journal compliance with REF

SHERPA REF screen shotJisc have today announced the launch of SHERPA REF, a tool which will enable authors to easily check whether a journal complies with HEFCE’s open access (OA) policy for the Research Excellence Framework (REF).

From their news:

SHERPA REF beta is a web service – funded and endorsed by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) – that allows authors and institutions to quickly, accurately and easily check whether a journal they wish to publish in complies with open access (OA) policy for the Research Excellence Framework (REF).

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The NECTAR journey: from acceptance to compliance


The University’s new Open Access policy – driven by HEFCE requirements for the post-2014 REF – has a simple message at heart for publishing researchers: act on acceptance. In practice, this means timely deposit of items in NECTAR, and we’ve made a few changes to help with this. This post takes a look at the NECTAR workflow, from acceptance to publication.

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Important: new open access policy for the University

At last week’s meeting of the University’s Research and Enterprise Committee, members approved a new open access policy for the University.  Aligned with, and supporting, HEFCE’s open access policy for the REF, the University policy states:

The University supports the principle of open access and expects researchers to share their research outputs freely, subject to legal, ethical, commercial or contractual constraints.

From 1st April 2016:
• All researchers will record bibliographic details of their research outputs in NECTAR within three months of the date of acceptance for publication, presentation or other dissemination in the public arena.
• The authors of journal articles and conference proceedings will upload the accepted full text copies of their work to NECTAR within three months of acceptance for publication.
• The full content of other research outputs should be deposited In NECTAR as soon as possible.
• All full content will be made openly available immediately or following the expiry of an agreed embargo period.

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The future of printed academic books

nu-information-services-park-373If you haven’t previously read ‘The Conversation‘ then let me introduce you to this excellent blog with this post on the future of academic print books.

Written by Donald Barclay, Deputy University Librarian at the University of California Merced, the article highlights the impact of falling budgets and rising prices on academic book sales and proposes the open access monograph as a viable alternative.  But first, he argues, academic distrust of digital publication has to be overcome…

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OA and the research lifecycle 7: disseminating your research

OA lifecycle disseminationIn deciding whether and how to provide open access to your published work you need to consider:

  • The nature of the research output
  • Your funder’s open access policy
  • The availability of funds to pay article processing charges (if necessary)
  • Your publisher’s open access policy
  • The availability of an open access subject or institutional repository

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