Blog Archives

PhD Transfer Seminar – Rethinking the Robinsonade…

Dear all,

You are all cordially invited to attend Bochra Benaissa’s PhD Transfer Seminar at 2.15pm on Wednesday 4 October in room MY120 (Maidwell Building, Avenue Campus)

Please see Bochra’s synopsis:

Rethinking the Robinsonade: Self and Environment in Twentieth-Century Desert Island Narratives

Bochra Benaissa

My research explores the ways in which modern Robinsonades can be read in the light of an alternative approach to island narratives, bringing to light ways in which the earliest Robinsonades seek to marginalize the specificity of environment and geography, whilst the modern ones depend upon them as the dominant themes. Although it might seem that all desert island stories are similar since they all address the question of an autonomous human nature, the first two chapters of this study show how the self can more productively be viewed through a study of the protagonist’s interaction with other creatures existing on the island. It also explores the relation that the protagonist builds with his or her surroundings and how in the more recent Robinsonades, this suggests a new ecological understanding of the self.

The objective of the introductory chapter is to situate the research in the context of the genre’s development since the early eighteenth century, demonstrating how the values which it embodies have changed historically. The second chapter then focuses upon texts from the twentieth-century Robinsonades and their preoccupation with transformations of the self in relation to non-human animals. Using an eco-critical approach informed by the work of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, particularly their notion of ‘becoming animal’, it examines literary constructions of man and the environment and explores how twentieth-century desert island narratives are often used to understand and critique man’s dominance over nature.

Open Access Week – 23rd to 29th October 2017

The theme for this year’s 10th International Open Access Week is “Open in order to…”

There are many benefits to open access,  including greater visibility of research, increases in citations, and ensuring far greater access to research.  HEFCE’s open access policy for REF2021 has seen the greatest shift in practice in terms of open access within the UK, and there are few of you who will not have been asked about uploading your accepted manuscripts to NECTAR!  Whilst we realise this can sometimes be an arduous task for some, it is necessary.  Rather than presenting to you once again the benefits of open access, we’d like to hear from you!

We are holding a competition for the best examples of where open access has benefited your research, if open access has made a difference to your work or research then we’d love to hear from you!  All that’s required is a few minutes of your time, a short paragraph will suffice… though please don’t be limited by this!

The best judged entry will rewarded with a lovely bottle of champagne… and will featured on the staff intranet research page!  All entries will also go into a draw for a further bottle of champagne!  If champagne is not to your liking, then a £20 amazon voucher will be awarded instead!

Dawn Hibbert, Head of Research Support will also be presenting a seminar on Research Data Management – Making your data count – maximising impact (All this research… All this Data… Use it.. Preserve it… Make a Difference.. Make an Impact! – warning – this presentation uses images from the genocide memorial in Kigali, Rwanda that may be upsetting).

Key Dates:

Deadline for applications for “How Open Access has benefited your Research” 5 pm Monday 23rd of October

Seminar – Research Data Management :

Avenue Campus – 27th October 11 am – 12 pm – Avenue Boardroom

Park Campus – 24th October 11am – 12 pm – Venue to be confirmed

Seminar – Criminology – 21 September

Paula Bowles; Criminology – Faculty of Health and Society, will be holding the following seminar

Thursday 21st September, 14.00-14.45, Park Campus, S138

“Patriotism is not enough”: Reframing the criminal ex-serviceman[1]

The narrative of the dangerous and criminal ex-serviceman is well established. In such accounts, men go to war, (the fortunate ones) return home disillusioned and angry and erupt into violence. Such travails are explained through the rhetoric of patriotism and heroism as soldiers “falling” into crime. Attempts are then made to pathologise their violent behaviour through Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (with or without a medical diagnosis). The problem, as this thesis seeks to demonstrate is, despite recent attempts to demonstrate the overrepresentation of ex-servicemen in prison, there is no empirical data to support such a narrative.

[1] ‘Patriotism is not enough. I must have no bitterness or hatred for anyone’ (Edith Cavell, 1915 inscribed beneath her memorial, St. Martin’s Place,  London).

 

Inaugural Research Ethics Seminar

The Research Ethics Committee has established a series of seminars to bring researchers together to discuss current and best practice in research ethics. The seminars are for any staff or postgraduate research students. Each seminar will discuss paper related to research ethics. The first meeting will take place on 1st June 2017, from 12:00 to 13:30 in Top Lodge Conservatory, Park Campus.

This inaugural meeting will discuss the following paper:

Reubi, D. 2012. The human capacity to reflect and decide: Bioethics and the reconfiguration of the research subject in the British biomedical sciences. Social Studies of Science. 42(3): 348-368.

Please come along prepared to discuss the selected paper with others from a diverse range of academic disciplines. 

Click here to book a place.

Transfer seminar – Parapsychology and Buddhism

You are invited to Chetak Nangare’s PhD transfer seminar on Monday 3 April at 3pm in Fawsley F31. All are welcome.

PhD project title: “Parapsychology and Buddhism — to afford a comparison between descriptions of psychic experiences in Buddhist works and in parapsychological research” Read the rest of this entry

Reminder – Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN) Funding Opportunities Seminar

You are invited to a seminar on funding opportunities on Thursday March 17, between 1–3pm in the Newton Grand Hall.

The seminar will briefly review the advantages for university staff of working with industry, and explore ways to make a start, or deepen your links with businesses. There will be an opportunity to look at the financial support available from government and other sources (including European funding) to support collaborations. It will also review the characteristics of a good collaborative funding bid.

The seminar will be conducted by Prof Carolyn Roberts (Specialist) and Dr Lis Broome (Knowledge Transfer Manager), from the Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN), which is the engagement arm of Innovate UK, the UK’s innovation agency.  Professor Roberts and Dr Broome will be available for specific advice and follow up on potential projects after the main session.

The KTN is a membership organisation with some 60,000 members spread across a variety of sectors and types of companies and other organisations in the public and voluntary sectors.

Transfer seminar “Human behaviour modelling”

On Friday, 26th February at 1 pm Mohamed Redha Sidoumou will be presenting his Transfer Seminar on “Human behaviour modelling” in Room NW101. Please come along and see what his research is all about.

Transfer seminar “The Zimbabwean student: examining the experiences of migrant students in English secondary schools”

You are invited to Emmanuel Maphosa’s transfer seminar entitled ‘The Zimbabwean student: examining the experiences of migrant students in English secondary schools”.

It will take place on Tuesday 16th February 2016 at 12.30-1.30pm in S017.

A poster for the event is attached to this post.

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School of Education seminar series

The School of Education have announced their seminar programme for the rest of 2015. Covering a range of topics from the use of intellectual capital to early childhood pedagogy in Japan, these seminars are open to staff and students with the School of Education offering a warm welcome to all.

Continue reading to see the full programme.

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Workshop: Conceptual and Methodological Issues in Sustainability Research

Submitted by Dr Sandy MacDonald

The above workshop will be held in room C226 on 18th November from 2 to 4pm.

About the speaker:

Dr Mohamed Saeudy is lecturer in Accounting and Finance at School of Management and Business, Aberystwyth University. Dr Saeudy is a qualitative researcher in Social and Environmental Accounting. His research interest centres on how financial and accounting practices may help business institutions to be more sustainable. His work has focused on developing organisational lenses to understand accounting for sustainable development practices in different organisational settings e.g. small and medium size businesses and higher education institutions. His current work explores the accounting for sustainable development practices in the banking sector. Furthermore, his research interests focus around the main impediments and motivations of organisational sustainability. Dr Saeudy has spent many years working in the banking industry in Egypt and UK. He had also held a research and teaching commitments in accounting and finance at the University of Derby. He also led and taught the Green Accounting and Sustainability Modules at Keele University covering the topics ranging from accountability processes to sustainable business strategies and policies.

If you wish to attend please let Debbie Christopher know.