Blog Archives

Prof. Charles Oppenheim – Webinar – Research Ethics and Legal Issues

21st of February – 12 pm

Join us for the first in a series of webinars by Professor Charles Oppenheim, including time for questions, covering everything you ever wanted to know about research but were too afraid to ask.

The first webinar will be taking an in depth look into Research Ethics and the legal issues that surround this.

Whether you are almost ready to publish your results, beginning to think about a research project, have thought about doing research, or are currently researching then this webinar is for you.

Ethical integrity is increasingly required and expected by all who engage in research and this has implications into the way our research is conducted.

If you haven’t got your ticket yet please get yours today:

http://bit.ly/2kNE3pT


 

 

Impact – REF

The Research Excellence Framework was the first exercise to assess the impact of research outside of academia. Impact was defined as ‘an effect on, change or benefit to the economy, society, culture, public policy or services, health, the environment or quality of life, beyond academia’. HEFCE

Measuring the impact that our research has on society and cultures, and being able to demonstrate this impact, has implications for future funding.

Fast track have studied the most succesful case studies from the previous REF, and published their findings in an article entitled:  10 lessons from grant proposals that led to the most significant and far-reaching impacts.

Very much worth a read for those who are looking to submit to the next REF.

Webinar – Research Methods

Our visiting Professor, Charles Oppenheim, will be presenting a webinar on the 21st of February with a focus on Research Methods… (for non-researchers too).  Charles is a gifted speaker, known for his expertise on Intellectual Property Rights, other legal issues such as Freedom of Information and Data Protection, Librarianship and Information Science, Bibliometrics, Research Evaluation, Scholarly Publishing and Open Access

Charles has published more than 400 journal articles, plus numerous books, book chapters and reports.

If you have ever had a question you wanted to ask about research and were too afraid to ask, or can’t find the answer despite doing your own research, or would just like an expert opinion on some research you are either undertaking or thinking of undertaking.. this is the webinar for you.

We will be hosting the webinar in the Dialogue Café, based in the Library at Park Avenue Campus.  After the first hour those in attendance will be able to split into groups to discuss various topics brought up during the course of the webinar.

For those unable to attend at the Dialogue Café you will be able to tune in to the webinar from the comfort of your own desk!

Please do take the most of this opportunity.  As spaces are limited for the Dialouge Café interface please do select webinar only if you will only be attending the webinar.

Register here:  http://bit.ly/2kNE3pT

Most Downloaded Outputs for January 2017

Pickton, M. (2013) Writing your research plan. In: Grant, M. J., Sen, B. and Spring, H. (eds.) Research, Evaluation and Audit: Key Steps in Demonstrating Your Value. London: Facet Publishing. pp. 45-63. 290
Jackson, P. and Feldman, M. (2011) The EDL: Britain’s ‘New Far Right’ social movement. Northampton: The University of Northampton. 137
Lama, A., Bates, M. P., Covington, A. D., Allen, S. C. H. and Antunes, A. P. M. (2013) Methods of isolation and identification of pathogenic and potential pathogenic bacteria from skins and tannery effluents. Journal of the American Leather Chemists Association. 108(2), pp. 48-62. 0002-9726. 124
Mackley, J. S. (2012) The Anglo Saxons and their gods (still) among us. Lecture presented to: The University of Northampton Staff Research Forum, The University of Northampton, 12 March 2012. (Unpublished) 93
Livingstone, I. and Warren, A. (1996) Aeolian Geomorphology: an Introduction. Harlow: Longman. 058208704X. 73
Paul, H., Antunes, A. P. M., Covington, A. D., Evans, P. and Phillips, P. S. (2013) Towards zero solid waste: utilising tannery waste as a protein source for poultry feed. In: The 28th International Conference on Solid Waste Technology and Management. Philadelphia USA: The Journal of Solid Waste Technology and Management. ISSN 1091-8043. Also presented at: XXXII Congress of the International Union of Leather Technologists and Chemists Societies (IULTCS), Istanbul, Turkey, 29-31 May 2013 68
Hollinshead, R., Farley, R. and Keating, E. (2010) Public art strategies. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Grit & Pearl. 59
Wu, I.-Y. (2014) Being formless: a Daoist movement practice. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 58
Jament, J. (2009) Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) within a South Indian (Keralian) mainstream school context. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 54
Kassem, R. (2014) Detecting asset misappropriation: a framework for external auditors. International Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Performance Evaluation (IJAAPE). 10(1), pp. 1-42. 1740-8008. 53

Images of Research 2016-17: Vote for your 3 favourites

The Images of Research (IoR) exhibition, run by the University of Northampton Graduate School, is now open in the Avenue Gallery corridor and will stay there until February 17th 2017. After this it will travel to Park Campus, to be displayed on the ground floor of Rockingham Library until mid March, then at Avenue Library entrance until Easter.

The IoR competition offers researchers a chance to illustrate or represent their research using a unique image, along with an abstract of up to 150 words describing how the image reflects their research. An annual competition which started in 2013, IoR creatively showcases research at the University and the competition reflects a wide range of research projects as diverse as the images are creative. The images are the perfect medium for engaging non-specialists and capture the essence of even complex research projects in an accessible way.

If you don’t manage to see it in the flesh, so to speak, then why not vote online? Just take a look at the IoR 2017 Catalogue and follow the guidelines below. Voting closes on 13th April 2017. Read the rest of this entry

Resources for Research

If you need information or have questions about:

  • open access
  • research data management
  • HEFCE’s open access policy
  • Non-Compliant Journals for the next REF
  • Predatory Journals
  • Payment of Article Processing Charges

Please check out our recently added “Resources” tab in the Research Hub!

Predatory Journals

The problem

Hundreds of new open access journals are being set up by reputable publishers, scholarly societies and universities each year. Unfortunately, alongside these reputable journals, an increasing number of pay-to-publish “vanity” journals continue to appear. Such journals are referred to as ‘predatory’ or ‘bogus’ journals. Some academic authors are being scammed into submitting their research outputs to be published in these journals that do not have proper quality control or peer review processes.

The risks

  • No proper peer review is carried out to preserve the quality of the research output.
  • Damage to the reputation of the researcher and institution.
  • Researchers and institutions lend their reputation to a disreputable publication.
  • Negative impact on the REF submission if the publication is not detected.
  • Your article will most likely not be able to be published elsewhere.
  • Copyright would likely be retained by the publisher.

How to check for predatory journals?

Think   Check   Submit  – Provides a checklist of questions that can be used to identify trusted journals.

Look out for the following warning signs:

  • Board of Editors list shows that members are not recognised in their field or that they are affiliated with questionable institutions; however, this should be done with caution, as Board member names may be used without their permission.
  • Journals with dubious or non-existent addresses for their registered office.
  • Unsolicited email or paper communication inviting publication in journals you don’t know or have never heard of.
  • Unsolicited invitations to conferences run by event managers, not professionals in the research area, often at attractive destinations.
  • Note – Legitimate new journals acknowledge if they are newly created and do not yet have an impact factor.

Further steps to undertake:

  • Consult the Directory of Open Access Journals for reputable journals (doaj.org)
  • Check the publisher’s membership of Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (oaspa.org), Committee on Publication Ethics (www.publicationethics.org), and International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers (www.stm-assoc.org).
  • Reputable journals typically will be listed in the Journal Citation Report.
  • Resist the temptation to publish quickly and easily in any journal. Be aware of the publication landscape in your research area and the most reputable journals (check with your research leader if unsure).
  • Jeffrey Beall (librarian at the University of Colorado Denver) has also created lists of ‘Potential, possible or predatory’ scholarly open access journals and publishers. This list is controversial and has been debated, however it has been listed on many university webpages.

Related articles and blogs

University of Edinburgh Standards in Open Access scholarly communication: http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/information-services/research-support/publish-research/open-access/1.108824

Jeffery Beall’s website on scholarly Open Access: http://scholarlyoa.com/

‘Investigating Journals: The dark side of publishing’ by Declan Butler (in Nature): http://www.nature.com/news/investigating-journals-the-dark-side-of-publishing-1.12666

Berger, Monica and Jill Cirasella. “Beyond Beall’S List Better Understanding Predatory Publishers“. Crln.acrl.org. N.p., 2017. Web. 4 Jan. 2017.

Further Information

If you have any further questions on the information displayed here or if you would like advice on a specific journal please contact us at OpenAccess@northampton.ac.uk.

Top 10 Research Outputs from 2016

Happy New Year to all, looking forward to making more research available and easily found, so that others can benefit from the research done here in Northampton.

Nie, M. and Armellini, A. (2012) Enhancing curriculum design and delivery with OER. In: Cambridge 2012: Innovation and Impact – Openly Collaborating to Enhance Education, Conference Proceedings. Milton Keynes: Support Centre for Open Resources in Education, The Open University. 9780749229375. pp. 365-369. 2812
Mackley, J. S. (2012) The Anglo Saxons and their gods (still) among us. Lecture presented to: The University of Northampton Staff Research Forum, The University of Northampton, 12 March 2012. (Unpublished) 1971
Livingstone, I. and Warren, A. (1996) Aeolian Geomorphology: an Introduction. Harlow: Longman. 058208704X. 1242
Mortimer, K. and Laurie, S. (2012) Barriers to the implementation of Integrated Marketing Communications: the client perspective. In: Proceedings of Academy of Marketing Conference 2012. Southampton: Academy of Marketing. 9780854329472. 1050
Arvinen-Barrow, M. (2009) Psychological rehabilitation from sport injury: issues in training and development of chartered physiotherapists. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 936
Wilson, J. M. (2012) Antipodean rewritings of Great Expectations: Peter Carey’s Jack Maggs (1997) and Lloyd Jones’s Mister Pip (2007). In: Glenn, D., Haque, M. R., Kooyman , B. and Bierbaum, N. (eds.) The Shadow of the Precursor. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 220-235. 816
Hollinshead, R., Farley, R. and Keating, E. (2010) Public art strategies. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Grit & Pearl. 631
Mackley, J. S. (2007) The medieval legend of Judas Iscariot: the Vita of Judas and the Gospel of Barnabas. Paper presented to: York Medieval Religion Research Group Meeting, King’s Manor, University of York, 01 February 2007. (Unpublished) 603
Stickley, A. (2015) An exploration of occupational therapy practice in social enterprises in the UK. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 588
Watley, G. (2012) Identity and consumption practices of Northamptonshire Caribbeans c.1955-1989. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 566

Wondering Where to Publish?

ORCID IDs… Have You Got Yours Yet?

ORCIDORCID ID’s provide unique and persistent identifiers to researchers (much like a DOI for a journal article). Many funders—including the Wellcome Trust UK—now require ORCID IDs as part of the grant proposal process.

Wiley recently announced that from November 28th, “more than 500 Wiley journals using ScholarOne Manuscripts will require the submitting author (only) to provide an ORCID identifier (iD) when submitting a manuscript”1. This follows in the steps of other publishers such as IEEE and Hindawi that have required an ORCID Id since July 2016. Many other publishers have also introduced this requirement.

So how do you get an ORCID? The good news is that it is really easy – and takes no more than thirty seconds to register.

Once you have your ORCID ID you should include this when you submit publications and when you apply for grants.

1 Wiley, J., Sons, I., companies, or related and reserved, A. rights (2016) Wiley becomes First Major Publisher to require ORCID IDs for submitting authors. Available at: http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/PressRelease/pressReleaseId-129824.html (Accessed: 7 December 2016).