Category Archives: Support

Predatory Journals

The problem

Hundreds of new open access journals are being set up by reputable publishers, scholarly societies and universities each year. Unfortunately, alongside these reputable journals, an increasing number of pay-to-publish “vanity” journals continue to appear. Such journals are referred to as ‘predatory’ or ‘bogus’ journals. Some academic authors are being scammed into submitting their research outputs to be published in these journals that do not have proper quality control or peer review processes.

The risks

  • No proper peer review is carried out to preserve the quality of the research output.
  • Damage to the reputation of the researcher and institution.
  • Researchers and institutions lend their reputation to a disreputable publication.
  • Negative impact on the REF submission if the publication is not detected.
  • Your article will most likely not be able to be published elsewhere.
  • Copyright would likely be retained by the publisher.

How to check for predatory journals?

Think   Check   Submit  – Provides a checklist of questions that can be used to identify trusted journals.

Look out for the following warning signs:

  • Board of Editors list shows that members are not recognised in their field or that they are affiliated with questionable institutions; however, this should be done with caution, as Board member names may be used without their permission.
  • Journals with dubious or non-existent addresses for their registered office.
  • Unsolicited email or paper communication inviting publication in journals you don’t know or have never heard of.
  • Unsolicited invitations to conferences run by event managers, not professionals in the research area, often at attractive destinations.
  • Note – Legitimate new journals acknowledge if they are newly created and do not yet have an impact factor.

Further steps to undertake:

  • Consult the Directory of Open Access Journals for reputable journals (doaj.org)
  • Check the publisher’s membership of Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (oaspa.org), Committee on Publication Ethics (www.publicationethics.org), and International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers (www.stm-assoc.org).
  • Reputable journals typically will be listed in the Journal Citation Report.
  • Resist the temptation to publish quickly and easily in any journal. Be aware of the publication landscape in your research area and the most reputable journals (check with your research leader if unsure).
  • Jeffrey Beall (librarian at the University of Colorado Denver) has also created lists of ‘Potential, possible or predatory’ scholarly open access journals and publishers. This list is controversial and has been debated, however it has been listed on many university webpages.

Related articles and blogs

University of Edinburgh Standards in Open Access scholarly communication: http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/information-services/research-support/publish-research/open-access/1.108824

Jeffery Beall’s website on scholarly Open Access: http://scholarlyoa.com/

‘Investigating Journals: The dark side of publishing’ by Declan Butler (in Nature): http://www.nature.com/news/investigating-journals-the-dark-side-of-publishing-1.12666

Berger, Monica and Jill Cirasella. “Beyond Beall’S List Better Understanding Predatory Publishers“. Crln.acrl.org. N.p., 2017. Web. 4 Jan. 2017.

Further Information

If you have any further questions on the information displayed here or if you would like advice on a specific journal please contact us at OpenAccess@northampton.ac.uk.

Top 10 Research Outputs from 2016

Happy New Year to all, looking forward to making more research available and easily found, so that others can benefit from the research done here in Northampton.

Nie, M. and Armellini, A. (2012) Enhancing curriculum design and delivery with OER. In: Cambridge 2012: Innovation and Impact – Openly Collaborating to Enhance Education, Conference Proceedings. Milton Keynes: Support Centre for Open Resources in Education, The Open University. 9780749229375. pp. 365-369. 2812
Mackley, J. S. (2012) The Anglo Saxons and their gods (still) among us. Lecture presented to: The University of Northampton Staff Research Forum, The University of Northampton, 12 March 2012. (Unpublished) 1971
Livingstone, I. and Warren, A. (1996) Aeolian Geomorphology: an Introduction. Harlow: Longman. 058208704X. 1242
Mortimer, K. and Laurie, S. (2012) Barriers to the implementation of Integrated Marketing Communications: the client perspective. In: Proceedings of Academy of Marketing Conference 2012. Southampton: Academy of Marketing. 9780854329472. 1050
Arvinen-Barrow, M. (2009) Psychological rehabilitation from sport injury: issues in training and development of chartered physiotherapists. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 936
Wilson, J. M. (2012) Antipodean rewritings of Great Expectations: Peter Carey’s Jack Maggs (1997) and Lloyd Jones’s Mister Pip (2007). In: Glenn, D., Haque, M. R., Kooyman , B. and Bierbaum, N. (eds.) The Shadow of the Precursor. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 220-235. 816
Hollinshead, R., Farley, R. and Keating, E. (2010) Public art strategies. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Grit & Pearl. 631
Mackley, J. S. (2007) The medieval legend of Judas Iscariot: the Vita of Judas and the Gospel of Barnabas. Paper presented to: York Medieval Religion Research Group Meeting, King’s Manor, University of York, 01 February 2007. (Unpublished) 603
Stickley, A. (2015) An exploration of occupational therapy practice in social enterprises in the UK. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 588
Watley, G. (2012) Identity and consumption practices of Northamptonshire Caribbeans c.1955-1989. Doctoral thesis. The University of Northampton. 566

How to book Graduate School workshops and events on Gateway

Pushing_on_an_open_gate_-_geograph.org.uk_-_993511All workshops and events organised by the Graduate School are now available to view and book via Gateway, our online postgraduate research management system.

  1. Go to Gateway.
  2. Log in, choose the link ‘Calendar’ from the left hand menu.
  3. Click on the title of the workshop you’re interested in – all workshops/events are in date order.
  4. Click on the Green dot ‘Respond’.
  5. Choose ‘Attending’ then submit. You have the option to write a note, for instance if you know you’re going to be late arriving at the workshop.
  6. If you subsequently need to cancel your place just repeat the process and change the response to ‘Not Attending’.
  7. If you are interested in the workshop but cannot attend the date scheduled then choose Defer. This will let me know that you are interested in attending another time. We may be able to schedule the workshop again.
  8. To check which workshops you have booked onto and generate a list of attendances, read on.

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Useful links for postgraduate research students

This short post will give you links to useful pages research degree students and supervisors at The University of Northampton. I recommend that you bookmark them or add them as favourites on your computers, laptops, tablets and mobiles. Or, bookmark this blog post. Read the rest of this entry

Gateway for supervisors – getting started

Gateway is our online postgraduate research (PGR) management system. This post is to help supervisors to get started using it.

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Gateway for postgraduate research students – getting started

Gateway is our online postgraduate research (PGR) management system. This post is to help postgraduate researchers (PGRs) to get started using it.

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‘Gateway’, the postgraduate research management system

Gateway is our online postgraduate research (PGR) management system. The objectives of the system are to:

  • Provide a shared, web-based record system for PGR students, their supervisors, school research leaders and the Graduate School;
  • Provide electronic records of supervision meetings;
  • Replace paper forms and signatures with electronic workflows and sign-off for all registration, progression and examination processes;
  • Provide online booking and records of training and development, accessible to students and supervisors;
  • Maintain support and contact with students and supervisors in any location;
  • Give access using existing usernames and passwords.

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Accessing resources off campus: update

FAQ: Why can’t I access resources off campus?

With very few exceptions (listed here), you should be able to use your university login details to access the library’s resources, irrespective of whether you are located on or off campus.

If you find that you are not being given the opportunity to log in with your university details then there are several possible explanations.
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Essential PhD tips: 10 articles all doctoral students should read

The THE has some useful reading on their Website for research students.Whether you’re still deciding on doing a doctorate or you’re nearing the end of a PhD, there’ll be something of interest in these ten tips. They include…

  • 14 essential PhD questions answered
  • Choosing a PhD subject
  • The PhD experience: this far, and no further
  • 10 steps to PhD failure
  • How not to write a PhD thesis
  • Realistic expectations keep you on the path to a PhD
  • 10 truths a PhD supervisor will never tell you
  • Me and my PhD supervisor: tales of love and loathing
  • How to get students through their PhD thesis
  • How to get ahead with a PhD

Have your say on reference management

Do you use RefWorks? Mendeley? OneNote, Papers, CiteULike? Do they improve your life, or raise your blood pressure? Is there anything you wish they did, or didn’t do? Do you avoid them altogether?

All researchers and staff are invited to take part in our survey on the use of reference managers. This is part of a project within Library and Learning Services looking at support and provision for reference management and citation services.
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