Category Archives: Lectures & seminars

Upcoming transfer seminars

You are cordially invited to the following transfer seminars taking place in Avenue campus:

24th January,  Imane Tiahi, in the Avenue Boardroom at 12:00: Increasing Students’ Engagement, Interaction, and Motivation in English Learning: Using Mobile Applications, in the Algeria higher education. 

24th January, Abdellah Maachou, in MR 36 at 14:00: The Enhancement of Learner Motivation and English Speaking Identity through the Integration of Films in EFL classrooms: the Case of Algerian EFL First Year University Students.

26th January, Nour Zantah, in W23a, Walgrave building at 09:30: The Aesthetic and Expressive Values of Violence through Art.

31st January, Fatima Zahaf, in MY36 at 14:00: Examining how Algerian women living in the United Kingdom negotiate online social activities by using virtual third spaces.

All Welcome

Transfer Seminar – Teaching Literature Using Critical Thinking and Communicative Teaching Language Approaches

Wednesday 29th November – 3 pm.

Location – MY120 Maidwell Boardroom.

All PhD students and staff at UoN are invited to attend Elhadj Benmoussa’s transfer seminar. Please note the change of location of the seminar.

 

 

Notice of transfer Seminar on Wednesday 22nd November at 3:15pm in MY120 (Maidwell)

All members of the  university are invited to attend this upcoming transfer seminar being held in MY120, Maidwell, Avenue Campus on Wednesday  22nd November at 3:15 to 4:00pm.

Imene Hamani.  The Role of In-Group Attachment Among Kabyle Migrants Living in Britain

Note the slightly later start time of 3:15pm due to the teaching commitments of the external (Melanie Crofts).

All  are welcome.

Psychology Seminar: Investigating the Impossible: 30 Years at the Koestler Parapsychology Unit.

The next psychology research seminar entitled: “the Impossible: 30 Years at the Koestler Parapsychology Unit” will be on Wednesday 29th November at 3.30pm in Fawsley room 43.  The speaker will be Professor Caroline Watt. Read the rest of this entry

Research Seminar: “Condition Monitoring and Fatigue Life of Pipeline Girth Welds”

You are cordially invited to Ayodeji Olamide’s research seminar entitled “Condition Monitoring and Fatigue Life of Pipeline Girth Welds” on Monday, 18th December at 14:00 in NW101 in Newton, Avenue Campus . Ayodeji is a student at the Faculty of Arts , Science and Technology and the aim of his study is to develop a parametric computational model to predict fatigue crack life and aid a better understanding of embedded and surface cracks in ultra-deepwater pipeline girth welds.

All Welcome

Collaborating with Businesses and Delivering REF Impact

Innovate UK have announced additional funding for 200 Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTPs) this financial year which will enable collaboration with businesses and deliver a REF impact.  Come along to this event and find out the support available to take advantage of this increase. KTPs provide a rewarding ongoing collaboration with businesses and there are two KTPs currently underway here at Northampton.

Hear from Steve McGonigal (Programme Leader & Senior Lecturer for Product Design in FAST) on the practices and the benefits from the KTP process. Charlotte Patrick (Key Sector and Knowledge Transfer Manager) will also update on the support and benefits dedicated to KTPs.

Wednesday, 8th November from 4-5pm in the Newton Grand Hall on Avenue Campus.

To book your place, please click on the Eventbrite link.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/collaborating-with-businesses-and-delivering-ref-impact-tickets-38723384686

 

Grounded Theory Forum

grounded-theory-forumThe first Grounded Theory Forum meeting is led by Fiona Barchard on 11th October from 1-3pm in S036. The topic of discussion will be ‘The trials and tribulations of Constructivist Grounded Theory analysis’.

For those who are interested in Grounded Theory, here are the dates and venues for the coming meetings:

• Thurs 7th Dec 2017, Brampton B6

• Tues 6th Feb 2018, Sulgrave S014

• Wed 2nd May 2018, Sulgrave S017

If you would like to attend or be on the Grounded Theory Forum mail list, please contact Sarah Neil 

Integrating Traditional Water Harvesting Systems into Modern Water Solutions

History, successes, challenges and needs

PRESENTATION followed by DISCUSSION

By Wells for India, Country Director

Om Prakash Sharma

Thursday 5th October 2017

16.00 – 18.00 Room MB8

 Om Prakash Sharma, will talk about

  • Traditional water harvesting solutions in the dryland regions of India: long-term sustainable solutions, and their recent history.
  • The reasons for the decline of small-scale, community-managed water regeneration solutions.
  • Success stories from rural parts of Rajasthan on the revival of traditional solutions and integrating them with modern water solutions along with future challenges and needs.
  • Issues of sustainability, governance and equity of water, including community ownership.
  • Solutions for the future in a climate-challenged world with a growing and urbanizing population.

Wells for India (www.wellsforindia.org) is a UK-based, not-for-profit organisation and, through 45 Indian NGO partners, is promoting sustainable water management in Rajasthan and Gujarat states of India.  Wells for India works with some of the poorest and marginalized rural communities in the drylands of India, where water is the key to enabling people to improve their lives, prospects and the environment that supports them. Om Prakash Sharma is a Civil Engineer, and has been working as Country Director for Wells for India for the last 18 years. His work over 28 years around water issues of drylands entails in blending traditional water management wisdom with modern technologies.

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND!

 

PhD Transfer Seminar – Rethinking the Robinsonade…

Dear all,

You are all cordially invited to attend Bochra Benaissa’s PhD Transfer Seminar at 2.15pm on Wednesday 4 October in room MY120 (Maidwell Building, Avenue Campus)

Please see Bochra’s synopsis:

Rethinking the Robinsonade: Self and Environment in Twentieth-Century Desert Island Narratives

Bochra Benaissa

My research explores the ways in which modern Robinsonades can be read in the light of an alternative approach to island narratives, bringing to light ways in which the earliest Robinsonades seek to marginalize the specificity of environment and geography, whilst the modern ones depend upon them as the dominant themes. Although it might seem that all desert island stories are similar since they all address the question of an autonomous human nature, the first two chapters of this study show how the self can more productively be viewed through a study of the protagonist’s interaction with other creatures existing on the island. It also explores the relation that the protagonist builds with his or her surroundings and how in the more recent Robinsonades, this suggests a new ecological understanding of the self.

The objective of the introductory chapter is to situate the research in the context of the genre’s development since the early eighteenth century, demonstrating how the values which it embodies have changed historically. The second chapter then focuses upon texts from the twentieth-century Robinsonades and their preoccupation with transformations of the self in relation to non-human animals. Using an eco-critical approach informed by the work of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, particularly their notion of ‘becoming animal’, it examines literary constructions of man and the environment and explores how twentieth-century desert island narratives are often used to understand and critique man’s dominance over nature.

Open Access Week – 23rd to 29th October 2017

The theme for this year’s 10th International Open Access Week is “Open in order to…”

There are many benefits to open access,  including greater visibility of research, increases in citations, and ensuring far greater access to research.  HEFCE’s open access policy for REF2021 has seen the greatest shift in practice in terms of open access within the UK, and there are few of you who will not have been asked about uploading your accepted manuscripts to NECTAR!  Whilst we realise this can sometimes be an arduous task for some, it is necessary.  Rather than presenting to you once again the benefits of open access, we’d like to hear from you!

We are holding a competition for the best examples of where open access has benefited your research, if open access has made a difference to your work or research then we’d love to hear from you!  All that’s required is a few minutes of your time, a short paragraph will suffice… though please don’t be limited by this!

The best judged entry will rewarded with a lovely bottle of champagne… and will featured on the staff intranet research page!  All entries will also go into a draw for a further bottle of champagne!  If champagne is not to your liking, then a £20 amazon voucher will be awarded instead!

Dawn Hibbert, Head of Research Support will also be presenting a seminar on Research Data Management – Making your data count – maximising impact (All this research… All this Data… Use it.. Preserve it… Make a Difference.. Make an Impact! – warning – this presentation uses images from the genocide memorial in Kigali, Rwanda that may be upsetting).

Key Dates:

Deadline for applications for “How Open Access has benefited your Research” 5 pm Monday 23rd of October

Seminar – Research Data Management :

Avenue Campus – 27th October 11 am – 12 pm – Avenue Boardroom

Park Campus – 24th October 11am – 12 pm – Venue to be confirmed