Blog Archives

REF – OPEN ACCESS

Each Unit of Assessment will need to submit a section on “open research”, detailing the submitting unit’s open access strategy, including where this goes above and beyond the REF open access policy requirements, and wider activity to encourage the effective sharing and managment of research data.

To assist us in meeting this criteria, please ensure that all research outputs that are accepted for publication are uploaded to NECTAR as soon as they have been accepted

Note – copyright will be checked, and all publisher’s policies will be respected. What can be made open, will be!

Note – by depositing your work in NECTAR this does not make your work automatically open access.

If you have any questions about embargo periods or credibility of journals that you are looking to publish in please email openaccess@northampton.ac.uk

Open Access Requirements for all journal articles and conference proceedings accepted for publication from the 1st of April 2016 are:

Deposit – within 3 months of acceptance

Embargo Periods – 12 months – Panel A and B (STEM), 24 Months Panel C and D

 

 

 

The NECTAR journey: from acceptance to compliance


The University’s new Open Access policy – driven by HEFCE requirements for the post-2014 REF – has a simple message at heart for publishing researchers: act on acceptance. In practice, this means timely deposit of items in NECTAR, and we’ve made a few changes to help with this. This post takes a look at the NECTAR workflow, from acceptance to publication.

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Important: new open access policy for the University

At last week’s meeting of the University’s Research and Enterprise Committee, members approved a new open access policy for the University.  Aligned with, and supporting, HEFCE’s open access policy for the REF, the University policy states:

The University supports the principle of open access and expects researchers to share their research outputs freely, subject to legal, ethical, commercial or contractual constraints.

From 1st April 2016:
• All researchers will record bibliographic details of their research outputs in NECTAR within three months of the date of acceptance for publication, presentation or other dissemination in the public arena.
• The authors of journal articles and conference proceedings will upload the accepted full text copies of their work to NECTAR within three months of acceptance for publication.
• The full content of other research outputs should be deposited In NECTAR as soon as possible.
• All full content will be made openly available immediately or following the expiry of an agreed embargo period.

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The future of printed academic books

nu-information-services-park-373If you haven’t previously read ‘The Conversation‘ then let me introduce you to this excellent blog with this post on the future of academic print books.

Written by Donald Barclay, Deputy University Librarian at the University of California Merced, the article highlights the impact of falling budgets and rising prices on academic book sales and proposes the open access monograph as a viable alternative.  But first, he argues, academic distrust of digital publication has to be overcome…

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OA and the research lifecycle 7: disseminating your research

OA lifecycle disseminationIn deciding whether and how to provide open access to your published work you need to consider:

  • The nature of the research output
  • Your funder’s open access policy
  • The availability of funds to pay article processing charges (if necessary)
  • Your publisher’s open access policy
  • The availability of an open access subject or institutional repository

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OA and the research lifecycle 6: writing up

OA lifecycle writing upIn terms of writing up, the preparation needed for open access is not dissimilar from that required for other types of publication.

A major consideration is whether you have made use of third party copyright material, i.e. material that you did not create or for which you are no longer the rights holder.

There are a number of useful websites which cover this topic, for example the University of Exeter’s  Third party copyright page or Taylor and Francis’ Using third party material in your article, but the bottom line is that, unless you qualify for an exception to copyright, you will need the rights owner’s permission to use third party material in your open access work.  If you were publishing your paper in a traditional journal, the publisher would make sure that you sought the appropriate permission; if you are making your work open access yourself (for example by uploading your thesis to NECTAR) then it is your responsibility to ensure you do not break the law.

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OA and the research lifecycle 5: collecting and analysing data

OA lifecycle data collectionIf you anticipate that your research data will be re-used in future (either by yourself or others) there are a few things you need to think about as you collect and analyse your data.

Ethical data sharing

Much research data about people—even sensitive data—can be shared ethically and legally if researchers employ strategies of informed consent, anonymisation and controlling access to data.” (UK Data Archive)

The UK Data Archive (UKDA) and its sister service the UK Data Service are great sources of useful information on the creation and management of data.  The UKDA’s ‘consent and ethics‘ web pages cover the key principles of research ethics that have a bearing on data sharing; the legal context of data sharing; all types of consent and how to get it; and the anonymisation of quantitative and qualitative data.  They usefully provide sample consent forms and information sheets for various types of research project.

Another useful source is the Australian National Data Service’s guide to publishing and sharing sensitive data.

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OA and the research lifecycle 4: conducting the literature review

OA lifecycle literature review

As a librarian, when I need to conduct a literature review I go first to NELSON, to interrogate the library’s subscription databases.  From there I may try the individual databases that are most relevant to my subject (Web of Science, Emerald and so forth), and after that to CORE, to pick up the open access literature.

The advantage of using CORE is that it usually returns a number of results that haven’t appeared elsewhere.  This is not only because CORE’s coverage is immense (just under 25 million open access articles) but also because the content it harvests is not restricted to the peer reviewed journal literature: CORE also has research reports, books, conference papers, theses and a host of other grey literature.

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OA and the research lifecycle 3: bidding for funding

OA lifecycle bid for fundingOpen access to published work

Many funders, especially those awarding public monies, now make it a prerequisite of funding that all published outputs should be made open access.  You should make it clear in your bid how you intend to comply with this requirement.

The main issues you need to address at the bidding stage are:

  • Does your prospective funder have a policy on open access?
  • If so, have they opted for ‘gold’ (made OA by the publisher) or ‘green’ (deposited in an OA repository) open access to published outputs?
  • If ‘gold’, are they willing to pay article processing charges (APCs)?
  • Do they require open access outputs to be released under a particular licence (e.g. CC BY)?
  • Are you and your collaborative partners willing to comply with the funder’s OA requirements?

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OA and the research lifecycle 2: producing the research proposal

OA Lifecycle: Research Proposal

Your research proposal is likely to address a range of issues arising throughout the research lifecycle, some of which are covered by the other posts in this series.  To avoid repetition, in this post I will focus on some of the things to consider if you plan to engage with open access in a collaborative project.

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