Blog Archives

Published with Emerald?

Emerald Publishing have updated their open access policy, and now allow all accepted manuscripts to be made freely available through your institutional repository (NECTAR), without any embargo period.  This applies to articles that have been previously published, and those which are yet to be published.

The Research Support Team will be identifying as many of our Emerald Publications as possible that currently have embargo periods set, and removing these.  If we have missed your publication, please email Nectar@northampton.ac.uk and we will make the necessary changes as soon as possible.

More information:

http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/openaccess/oa_policies.htm

 

Research Gate – Attn All Researchers

If you use Research Gate – Please ensure that you have uploaded the accepted manuscript to NECTAR… STM (International Association of Scientific Technical and Medical Publishers) are taking on Research Gate with regards to copyright infringment…

By all means use Research Gate – but rather than uploading the full text, please provide a link to your article that’s in NECTAR.

What is made public through NECTAR has had the copyright checked by professional staff, and the University is also covered by a takedown notice.  We cannot cover you for your use of Research Gate.

More info at https://t.co/bdD2wjCYmn

 

Article Processing Charges – Update

The University of Northampton has an institutional fund for the payment of article processing charges.

Publishing “gold” allows your research, the published version,  to be made freely available immediately upon publication to anyone with internet access.  This enables people to access your work without waiting for embargo periods to pass (which can be up to 5 years or more!) and for the published version to be made freely available, rather than your accepted manuscript!

The University has entered into a number of agreements that allow us discounts on the cost of article processing charges:

  • IEEE (25% discount – prepaid account)
  • Springer (All APCs at zero cost – please select the open access option)
  • SAGE (£200 Discount)
  • Taylor and Francis (75% discount on most journals)
  • Wylie (25% Discount)

When publishing with any of the above publishers, please contact openaccess@northampton.ac.uk and we will guide you through the process.

If you have any questions in relation to article processing charges, copyright or the quality of a journal,  please do contact openaccess@northampton.ac.uk prior to signing a copyright transfer agreement.

 

Your online thesis: what you need to know

The PGR Thesis and Examination Policy states that it is mandatory for final, post-examination copies of research degree theses to be deposited in NECTAR.  But what does this mean for PGR students (and their supervisors)?

This post will outline the policy and procedure for depositing your thesis in NECTAR and some the issues you need to consider when doing this.

Gather your strength and read on…

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™, © and patent pending: unpicking intellectual property rights with IP Tutor

We all use intellectual property and we all create intellectual property, but the intricacies of IP law are often daunting. IP Tutor is an online course from the government’s Intellectual Property Office. For the low price of half an hour of your time it will help you understand the role and value of IP, whether you’re building on the work of others or maximising the potential of your own output.

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Getty Images: the wider picture

You may have seen news reports over the last week – such as this one from the BBC – on Getty Images making a substantial chunk of its vast image library free-to-use on blogs and social media.

At first glance, this seems like great news for bloggers looking for quality images to accompany their posts. But as with most free lunches, you might want to read the fine print before you grab your knife and fork.

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‘Hunting down permissions’: fair use, copyright and academic publishing

I was particularly intrigued by the Slate article Executors or Executioners? by Joseph Thomas, the frustrated would-be author of a Shel Siverstein biography, not only because Silverstein is currently among my daughter’s favourite authors but also for the discussion of the chilling effect that ‘playing it safe’ with copyright can have on fair use and scholarly publishing.

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