Blog Archives

Article Processing Charges – Update

The University of Northampton has an institutional fund for the payment of article processing charges.

Publishing “gold” allows your research, the published version,  to be made freely available immediately upon publication to anyone with internet access.  This enables people to access your work without waiting for embargo periods to pass (which can be up to 5 years or more!) and for the published version to be made freely available, rather than your accepted manuscript!

The University has entered into a number of agreements that allow us discounts on the cost of article processing charges:

  • IEEE (25% discount – prepaid account)
  • Springer (All APCs at zero cost – please select the open access option)
  • SAGE (£200 Discount)
  • Taylor and Francis (75% discount on most journals)
  • Wylie (25% Discount)

When publishing with any of the above publishers, please contact openaccess@northampton.ac.uk and we will guide you through the process.

If you have any questions in relation to article processing charges, copyright or the quality of a journal,  please do contact openaccess@northampton.ac.uk prior to signing a copyright transfer agreement.

 

Paying for open access: how much will it cost?

FAQ: How do I find out whether a journal has an option for immediate open access and if so, how much it will cost?

Does your proposed funder require immediate open access to all research outputs?

Do you need to include the cost of APCs in your bid?

Do you need to make sure your work has the earliest possible visibility and impact?

If the answer to any of these questions is yes then you will need to know whether any journal you choose to publish in offers an immediate (‘gold’) open access option and if so, how much it will cost.

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University Open Access Fund

Open Access logoFAQ: Does the University have any funds available to pay publishers’ article processing charges (APCs) and if so, how can I apply for these?

As of August 1st 2016 the University of Northampton has set aside an Open Access (OA) fund to support the payment of article processing charges (APCs).

APCs are the charges levied by publishers to cover the cost of making an individual article OA at the point of publication (aka ‘gold’ OA).  This may be in a fully OA journal or in a ‘hybrid’ journal which makes otherwise subscription only articles available OA on payment of an APC.

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Focus group invitation: give your views on the journal article publishing process

TFbookslogoAs part of their forthcoming workshop on publishing and reviewing, journals publisher, Taylor & Francis, are looking for 15 researchers to take part in a short focus group. Forming part of a project to improve the author journey, your views will influence and inform how their researcher-facing processes work in the future, with the aim of ensuring they meet the needs of the many researchers they work with.

Date: Thursday 30th June

Time: 1pm to 2pm (come from 12:30pm t0 to get your free lunch!)

Venue: Pytchley 101, Park Campus

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Report: Taylor & Francis – Insights into publishing

Last week I attended an interesting event put on by Taylor and Francis (T&F) and, knowing that quite a few Northampton researchers publish with T&F, I thought I’d share some of the things I learned.

There were several talks during the day, covering support for early career researchers; peer review and journal development; the role of the editorial team; journal production; dissemination; and open access.  The full slide presentation is available here but for me a number of points stood out.

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Open access and your published paper: a guide for authors

FAQ: I have just had an article accepted for publication and I’m unsure of my open access options.  What should I do?

With multiple publishing options and a host of sometimes conflicting institutional, funder and publisher requirements, the pathway to open access can sometimes be a confusing one.  The guide below is designed to help you navigate the route between having your article accepted for publication and making it open access in an appropriate and timely manner.

The guide covers both ‘green’ and ‘gold’ routes to open access and includes the University’s procedure for handling article processing charges (APCs).

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By any other name: rchive.it, RoMEO and your self-archiving rights

Can you self-archive your e-print? How would you know? What does it even mean? Why am I bothering you with this? These are all perfectly valid questions that may now have a more straightforward answer thanks to a rchive.it. Read on for details of how this web service can simplify an important part of the self-archiving process for NECTAR deposits.

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University ISBNs

Did you know that the University of Northampton is registered as a publisher for the purposes of allocating ISBNs to monographs produced by members of the University?

Some of the books we have published include:

Read on to find out how you can apply for an ISBN for your work.

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Digital Object Identifiers: what they are and where to find them

FAQ: What is a DOI and how can find out if my work has one?

A Digital Object Identifier, or DOI, uniquely and permanently identifies an object.  Although the ‘object’ in theory may be any entity (physical, digital or abstract), in practice the most frequent use of DOI names is to describe the location of electronic journal articles, data sets and other digital documents.  To date over 84 million DOI names have been assigned (see DOI Factsheet), each with a set of basic metadata and a pointer to the full content.

The principle behind the DOI system is that clicking on a DOI name will take you straight to the definitive copy of the item, irrespective of whether its web address (URL) has changed.

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Ebook price increases from three publishers

Dawson-header-logo-small” It is with regret that we have to inform you that with no prior notice from the publisher Wiley has imposed an immediate price increase across selected titles. “

So begins another email from Dawson books, our leading supplier of academic ebooks.  The email goes on to explain further:

” The price increases are the publisher’s reaction to a recent US Supreme Court ruling whereby lower priced editions bought elsewhere in the world were allowed to be sold back into the US, a market which has traditionally had higher prices than other markets. To reduce the impact on US sales, Wiley have chosen to increase the prices in the UK to match the American prices. Unfortunately we have no ability to influence this decision although our buying team has vigorously championed non-US customers against price increases.”

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