Blog Archives

Posthumous Posterous: the importance of the exit strategy

I this post I discuss the imminent closure of the Posterous blogging service, and the wider topic of what happens to your data when a tool you rely on is killed off (or, perhaps, you grow out of it and want to move elsewhere). I’ll take a look at the export options for various major online tools that researchers may be likely to use, and suggest a few things to check for when you’re starting out (or if you’re already knee-deep in published content).

Read the rest of this entry

Workshop for lecturers on Aspire reading lists

If you are engaged in teaching students at UoN and giving students reading lists, these workshops may be of interest to you. Further dates will be added and published here.

Library and Learning Services is offering workshops at Avenue on the Aspire Reading List Software on Feb 26th and March 4th (see below for details and times). Aspire is a piece of software that enables you to create an online reading list with direct links through to full text articles, websites, e-books and items on the library catalogue. You can also link to Aspire from within NILE. To sign up, please email the session leader running the workshop.

Aspire workshops will last an hour and you will be shown how Aspire works as well as being able to have a go at creating your own Aspire reading list. If you have a real reading list you’d like to put online, bring it along and we can work on it during the workshop. There will also be an extra half an hour at the end of the session, with a member of the LLS Academic Liaison Team on hand to help, for anyone who wants to stay and work on their reading list.

Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

Tuesday, Feb 26th
12:00 – 13:30, Tuesday, Feb 26th, in the Library IT Training Room (Avenue Library) – Aspire Session Leader: George Dimmock (georgina.dimmock@northampton.ac.uk)

Monday, March 4th
12:00-13:30, Monday, March 4th in the Library IT Training Room (Avenue Library) – Aspire Session Leader: Fiona MacLellan (fiona.maclellan@northampton.ac.uk)

Top seven predictions for the future of research

Sarah Porter, head of innovation at the JISC, knows that technology is moving fast and believes that it will have an ever-increasing influence on the way researchers work.  She and Torsten Reimer have come up with seven predictions for the future of research: Read the rest of this entry

R-Project Users Group – call for interest.

Rlogo R is a free, open-source software environment for statistical computing and graphics.  There is a possibility of setting up a University-wide R Users Group for researchers and/or providing training in using R, but first we need to gauge interest and experience.

If you are interested in such a group, or training in R, please email Simone Apel.
Please mention…
1. whether you have used R or not.
2. give an outline of what you have used it for (or might use it for).
3. whether you are interested in a User Group or being trained in R.

Citation analysis tool – Publish or Perish

This is one of a series of posts describing tools that are available for citation analysis.  For other tools see here.

Harzing’s Publish or Perish (PoP) “is a software program that retrieves and analyzes academic citations. It uses Google Scholar to obtain the raw citations, then analyzes these and calculates a series of citation metrics.” (Publish or Perish User’s Manual, 2012)

Read the rest of this entry

Citation analysis tool – Google Scholar

This is one of a series of posts describing tools that are available for citation analysis.  For other tools see here.

Google Scholar is the ‘academic’ version of the popular Google search engine.  It covers scholarly literature from a range of sources, including “academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other web sites” (Google, 2011). What Google doesn’t tell us are the names of these sources (i.e. which publishers, journals etc. are harvested) or the frequency of updates.  This means that we cannot be certain how comprehensive a search is or how up-to-date.

Read the rest of this entry

Citation analysis tool – Web of Science

This is one of a series of posts describing tools that are available for citation analysis.  For other tools see here.

Web of Science is one of the leading databases of scholarly research articles, covering a broad range of subject areas.  As a commercially provided database it features a number of added value services, including a sophisticated search function, links to cited and citing papers, citation reporting and an alerting service.

Read the rest of this entry

Wherefore art thou RoMEO?

FAQ: Can I legally upload the full text of my journal article to NECTAR?

At a School research meeting yesterday I was asked whether it was legal, for copyright reasons, to deposit the full text of a journal article in NECTAR.

The answer, perhaps surprisingly, is very often YES.

Read the rest of this entry