Blog Archives

Tools for scholarly communication – survey results

innovations in scholarly communicationsA few months ago I invited researchers to take part in a survey of the tools they used to support  their own scholarly communication.  Northampton’s answers were then combined with those from other universities to create a dataset of over 20,000 responses.

The number of responses from Northampton was relatively small (just 36) so these comments should be read with the appropriate health warnings but I promised to let you know our results.

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Report: Taylor & Francis – Insights into publishing

Last week I attended an interesting event put on by Taylor and Francis (T&F) and, knowing that quite a few Northampton researchers publish with T&F, I thought I’d share some of the things I learned.

There were several talks during the day, covering support for early career researchers; peer review and journal development; the role of the editorial team; journal production; dissemination; and open access.  The full slide presentation is available here but for me a number of points stood out.

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Tools for scholarly communication – how much do you know?

Which tools do you use to support your research workflow?  Are you aware of all the tools that are available?

Utrecht University have put together a list of over 400 tools used by researchers in the course of their research activity and have launched a survey to find out which of these are most commonly used by researchers worldwide.

The Innovations in Scholarly Communication survey takes about 8-12 minutes to complete and will introduce you to a host of tools that you may find useful.  The survey can be completed anonymously or you can put in your email address to receive a visual representation of your workflow compared to that of your peer group.

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